A month ago, after India started issuing excise duty notices to the companies that make beer, the industry was on a tear.

By now, the Indian government has had to spend about $1 billion on excise duty.

But the big brewers aren’t feeling the pinch.

The brewers say the government has allowed them to operate freely in the country.

But some critics, including the Supreme Court, have suggested that the brewers should pay a higher tax to fund the development of the economy.

Here are the big challenges facing the Indian beer industry:What you need the facts on this story:What is beer?

A beer is an alcoholic beverage that contains beer and alcohol.

The word “beer” comes from the Latin word for “water.”

It’s a fermented beverage, or beverage made from fermented grains, fruit, vegetables and spices.

Beer has many different kinds of ingredients.

There are beers made from barley, barley-based beer, wheat beer, ale, lager, lagers, pilsner and sours.

It’s made from malt, hops and barley.

The term “brewery” comes with a connotation of making and producing beer.

But in India, the word “brewer” comes primarily from the word for the person who brews beer.

The term “craft brewer” comes as a nod to the craft beer industry in the U.S.

A craft beer is a small-scale brewer that is based on small-batch brewing techniques and a commitment to quality.

A brewer can make one or several different types of beer, such as India Pale Ale, India Pale Lager, India Amber Ale, Imperial India Pale Ales, Imperial Lagers and IPAs.

Craft brewers can make many styles of beer depending on the type of yeast they use.

Many are home-brewers, using commercially available yeast and equipment.

In India, a craft brewer can produce one or more different types and flavors of beer.

Indian brewers are often called “beer makers.”

They are responsible for the creation of the craft beers that are sold in bars and pubs.

They also distribute the beer and distribute it to consumers.

Indian beer is the third most popular beer in India.

The number of craft breweries has grown by nearly a quarter since 2013.

But it still has a long way to go.

In India, craft breweries are small businesses.

They are small in size and often operate in a relatively rural area.

They typically rely on the support of large, local breweries to pay for the brewing equipment and equipment licenses.

There are more than 40 craft breweries in India today.

According to a 2015 report by the Beverage and Food Safety Association of India, nearly 90 percent of India’s breweries have fewer than 500 employees.

The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) reports that the total volume of beer brewed in India in 2014 was 1,931,716 barrels, an increase of 8.6 percent from 2014.

India has become a leader in craft brewing.

The industry is expected to grow at 6 percent annually in the next five years.

But many brewers have raised concerns about the impact that excise duty will have on the industry.

The excise tax on beer has been on a downward trend, with excise duty rates starting at 8.75 percent for the first 10 years and gradually rising.

In 2016, the excise duty rate went up to 12.5 percent.

The excise duty has led to some brewers having to raise prices.

The International Federation of Brewers of India (IFB) reported that in 2017, the cost of producing craft beer jumped by 2,700 percent.

In some cases, the increase in excise duty may have helped small breweries, which rely on small scale, by allowing them to charge a premium price for their products.

In other cases, a high excise duty is hurting the Indian craft beer market.

In 2017, there were over 15,000 craft breweries.

In 2020, that number reached more than 34,000.

The market for Indian craft beers is expected grow by 4 percent annually.

In 2018, there was a sharp increase in imports of beer from India, mainly from the U-19 age group, according to the FAO.

In 2019, there had been a 12.7 percent increase in import of beer into India from the United States.

India is a top exporter of beer to the U and Canada.

The import of beers from the European Union (EU) rose by 10 percent in 2018 and by 9 percent in 2019.