A new breed of flea that has taken hold in Israel is spreading around the country, posing a threat to thousands of farmers and their animals.

For years, the plague-carrying fleas have been on the rise in Israel, with some estimates saying the population has surpassed 10,000.

Israel is home to the world’s largest population of fleabites, with the country’s farmers producing a staggering 2.3 million tonnes of feed and other products.

But the numbers have exploded over the past decade, with an estimated 50,000 new fleas found in 2015 alone.

The fleas can carry a range of diseases, including toxoplasmosis, which can be fatal in up to 90 percent of cases.

Israel is also the world leader in the use of antibiotics and the number of antibiotics used per farmer has skyrocketed.

The emergence of new strains of the flea also raises concerns over the effectiveness of the existing and planned antibiotic treatments.

The Israeli government has been criticized for not adequately addressing the problem.

In response to the outbreak, the Health Ministry recently set up a task force to examine the possibility of using new antibiotic therapies, which it said could be more effective.

But some farmers say the plans may not be sufficient.

In an effort to reduce the spread of the new strains, the ministry is developing a system to identify and kill fleas and trace them to their source.

However, some farmers fear that it could take years before this system is ready.

“If we’re not careful, we’ll lose a lot of farmers in the long run, because the plague will just go through the roof,” said a farmer who asked not to be named.

In the meantime, farmers in Israel are getting creative in their efforts to eliminate fleas from their crops.

In addition to disinfecting and controlling the pests, they are also spreading out their food.

For example, a farmer in Israel’s central Galilee region recently began to spread a strain of the parasite on her own vegetables.

The idea is to keep the disease at bay for as long as possible so the parasite can be eliminated from the plants.

However, the strain has caused problems for her crops, and the farmer has lost her own business.

“It’s a difficult time, because we have a lot to lose,” the farmer told Haaretz.

“We can’t keep growing our own vegetables, because of the plague.”

In an attempt to prevent the spread, farmers across Israel are planting seeds that contain the parasite.

They are also using other techniques to try and stop the spread.

In one case, a group of farmers from a village in the Galilee village of Kfar Shelah set up an anti-virus farm in their fields.

They collected and stored food samples, and sprayed the seeds with the parasite in order to kill the fleas.

However the seeds are also a problem for the farmers.

“The first year, the virus spread very slowly, but now the virus has been spotted,” said one of the farmers who participated in the project.

“I think the strain is very important for the population, because they don’t know what the virus will do next.”

“We are not worried about the virus spreading, we just want to control it,” added another farmer.

In a country where the plague is still a problem, some are trying to stem the spread with the use, and use, of alternative strategies.

Some farmers are experimenting with using pesticides to kill flea eggs.

Others are trying out the use on their own crops to try to control the spread further.

In some cases, farmers are using alternative methods to fight the plague, including the use and propagation of plants that contain fleas to control them.

Others are trying new approaches to try a new strategy.

In the case of the Kfar Shesh Farm in the Negev Desert, the farmers planted several varieties of plants in their field to keep them away from the fleabite.

In 2017, the farms’ production of grain and other commodities was halved, and they are now hoping to resume production.

But for many farmers, the success of the anti-flea project has already left them with a bitter taste.

“I’ve lost money, I’ve lost everything,” said the farmer who is trying to use the seeds for another farm.

“The only thing I’ve learned from this is that the plague does not go away.

I will continue to try, until the plague goes away.”